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A real split pea souper

Soup 1

I am not the shopping fiend I used to be. I can spend all day trekking up and down the West End and come home with nothing to show for it but slightly raised blood pressure and sore feet. But occasionally when I’m out I still make impulse purchases, which explains why last week, I came home from ‘just nipping out’ with a bag of pig’s trotters.

Dazzled by their cheapness and pinkness, I couldn’t quite resist even though I had no idea what to do with them. Then inspired by a conversation about soup with Mister North, I remembered this mouthwateringly porky potage in the shape of erwtensoep or Dutch split pea soup. Thick as a plank and designed to be packed with piggy goodness, the pig’s trotters would make the perfect base.

Well known for their tendency to toward the gelatinous (and good for them. The jelly in a pork pie is the best bit) I figured something as absorbent as a split pea could take the risk and it would simply thicken everything up nicely if the stock seemed a bit gloopy.

I was also swung towards this soup by the addition of celeriac. Another impulse purchase back in the summer at Homebase saw me buying ten tiny celeriac plants in a tray. I planted them out, expecting only about a third of them to take. Fast forward six months and my patio is a convention of celeriac. All ten are thriving. I have a forest of leaves and a lot of celeriac needing eaten. Adding some to the soup was a start.

I began the prep with the weirdest bit and gave the trotters a shave with a spare and unused Bic razor. Not only are they quite pink and unnervingly delicate with their little nails, pig’s trotters are quite bristly. These were Tamworths and the fuzz was decidedly auburn. Much and all as I love red hair, I don’t want it in my dinner…

Trotters attended to, I turned my attention to the veg, trimming, peeling and cubing. Nothing difficult, just a little bit of time and effort. In went a rather sad looking leek, a few carrots, the whole small celeriac, an onion or two and a good handful of celeriac leaves for depth. I basically halved the amounts in the recipe above. I layered half a cup of split peas on the bottom of my Le Cresuet, then put the trotters on top, along with a spare rib pork chop. You’d add in the pork ribs and the bacon about now if you had them.

Then pile your diced veg on top, adding the other half cup of the split peas to the top. The meat will be hidden and it’ll look like pure vegetable and pulses. I added a few leftover stock ice cubes from the freezer which I think might actually have been pheasant. You always seem to get a dead pheasant in Dutch still lifes. I figure it couldn’t go amiss. I then topped it all up with 3 cups or 750ml of cold water and brought it to the boil before turning down to a simmer and leaving well alone for about an hour. No stirring, no poking, no peeking. Just leave it and get on with life.

An hour later take the lid off and see how the water levels are. You’ll want to check the texture of the stock and loosen it up a bit if it looks too thick and wobbly. I added a splash of water and then left it for another two hours or until the peas had softened and swelled and started to break up. Don’t cook it until they are total sludge. When you leave the leftovers overnight, the peas will soak up the remaining liquid and thicken and if you overcook you’ll be left with concrete not soup. Fish the trotters out and discard (I had enough skin and gristle with the tail). Give the peas a quick chivvy with the potato masher to thicken everything. Marvel at how a bog basic pork chop has become soft strands of loveliness and get stuck in with your spoon.

I was aware that pork and pulses are a good thing. I was expecting to like the combo in this bowl of soup. I wasn’t expecting to fall completely in love with split pea soup. But one mouthful and I was smitten. Rich with sweet porky flavour, it was bursting with taste and both the stock and peas gave it a suprisingly silky texture. It was fantastic. I practically licked the bowl clean and wanted a second helping, but wow, this soup is filling. I compromised by having it for breakfast next day.

Embrace this sudden cold snap and make this soup immediately. Use any pork on the bone to make a stock or take the challenge and buy some trotters for you instead of the dog. Add bacon, use up some smoked sausage, throw in some chorizo, use the leftover stock from doing a ham, the choices are endless. Just make sure you keep it porcine and it will reward you with being easy, cheap, healthy and filling. I impulse purchased some pork ribs today so I can make it again immediately…

 

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9 replies
  1. thelittleloaf
    thelittleloaf says:

    As you know I’m not a big soup fan, but I love all the flavours that have gone into this and split peas are a favourite of mine. However I’m not sure I could quite get to grips with those trotters!

  2. Becs@Lay the table
    Becs@Lay the table says:

    This looks really great – haven’t heard of that soup before. I’ve only had one experience with pigs trotters and it wasn’t good. I cooked them and they stank my flat out so I tipped it away, only to return and find my sink blocked with pig gelatine. Bleurgh!

  3. Miss South
    Miss South says:

    Eeek! That would be incredibly off putting. This is a super easy way to cook the trotters and they gave off no odour at all thank heavens. But if you aren’t quite recovered, just try it with the pork ribs to make a good stock. So tasty!

  4. Bee Rawlinson
    Bee Rawlinson says:

    I made this very thing the other day :) No trotters, but a few smoked sausages and a couple of spare rib chops, also added a sliced potato and some chopped parsley – it tends to be a bit of a moveable feast. I used to make this when the children were small (a seriously good meal on a tiny budget) and they still call it ‘hot dog soup’.

  5. Miss South
    Miss South says:

    It’s s a great budget dinner. And for some reason when you call it ‘hot dog soup’ it feels oddly naughty and a bit of a treat! Can’t wait for a freezing cold night with a bowl of this…

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

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  2. […] hearts first. Really quite small, I got 4 in the packet (and again a spare kidney as when I bought trotters from the same stall. I still didn’t know what to do with it.) and started by snipping out any […]

  3. […] at Todmorden Market to make up a rich stock, then made up a version of Miss South’s superb split-pea soup. Peppered with the last few scraps of meat from a couple of extra ribs, it was perfect fuel to […]

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